Courses

Courses

ALL EDUCATIONAL COURSES HAVE BEEN APPROVED FOR CE CREDIT!

The following courses will be offered for the 2018 WV EMS Conference. Continuing education credits will be offered for educational sessions.

General Session Courses

Keynote, Day 1: Thursday, October 11
Time: 9:00 a.m.
Course Title: Making Positive Change During America’s Heroin Epidemic
Course Speaker: Chief Jan Rader
Course Description: Jan will touch on the importance of first responder compassion fatigue and self-care as first responders’ roles continue to evolve in the wake of the heroin and opioid epidemic sweeping the country.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

General Session, Day 2: Friday, October 12
Time: 9:00 a.m.
Course Title: Cognitive Bias and Compassion Fatigue
Course Speaker: Dr. Michael Mills
Course Description: How can we ensure that our patients are receiving the best emergency care if we don’t care? This course will address the ongoing opioid crisis that West Virginia’s First Responders face daily in their jobs and how the demands impact their job performance. Discussions will address how responders react to specific emergency calls related to drug use, how that creates a bias in how we treat our patients, and the compassion fatigue that is created from the repetition of opioid response calls and overdoses.

This course will also include an annual update from the West Virginia Office of EMS.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours


Bonus Informational Session

Day: Thursday, October 11

Time: 12:15 p.m.
Course Title: National Registry Update
Course Description: NREMT staff will provide an update on the current status of the Nation’s EMS Certification and provide you with a summary of what’s new at the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. Topics covered will include the current state of National EMS Certification and important changes to NREMT policies and procedures. Following the formal presentation and update you’ll have the opportunity to participate in a spirited question and answer session.
Course Presenter: Donnie Woodyard, Chief Operations Officer, National Registry of EMTs


Day One: Thursday, October 11

Time: 10:45 a.m.

Administrative Course
Course Title: Running Lean: Doing More with Less in Your Volunteer Agency
Course Presenter: Nancy Magee, NREMT
Consultant, Managing Partner, MEDIC Training Solutions

Course Description: What is the cost of saving lives? Can we even quantify it? In today’s economic and healthcare environment, “If it saves even one life, it’s worth it,” is no longer sufficient justification for our operations. EMS system demands are increasing, tax bases are dwindling, public expectations are often unrealistic, and municipal officials are subjecting agencies to increased scrutiny of finances and expenditures. All around the country, volunteer EMS is in crisis.

Join Nancy Magee as she explores strategies to help your agency quantify assets on hand, control costs without reducing service, and better present your cause to the public in order to obtain, maintain and, if necessary, increase funding.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

Clinical Course
Course Title: Dingers, Stunners and Getting Your Bell Rung: Recognition and Treatment of Concussions
Course Presenter: Steven “Kelly” Grayson, NRP, CCEMT-P
Founder, MEDIC Training Solutions

Course Description: For years, “getting your bell rung” was considered a rite of passage in contact sports, and athletes were routinely pressured by coaches and peers to “walk it off” and get back into play. Now, with overwhelming evidence that the effects of brain concussions are cumulative and debilitating, it is more important than ever for EMS, coaches and athletic trainers to recognize the signs of post-concussive syndrome, provide proper on-the-field treatment, and understand the importance of removal from play and return-to-play criteria.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

 

Time: 1:15 p.m.

Administrative Course
Course Title: EMT’s Behaving Badly- Am I My Brother’s Keeper?
Course Presenter: Nancy Magee, NREMT
Consultant, Managing Partner, MEDIC Training Solutions

Course Description: News stories continue to surface reporting EMT’s and paramedics demonstrating onerous and downright dangerous behaviors. Refusing to respond to a baby in cardiac arrest, dumping a patient on the ER floor, sexual harassment of a female paramedic/ FF to the point of her committing suicide, disparaging of addicts on social media-these are just a few of the *highlights* of EMS news for 2015-2017.

At the same time, the rate of addiction and suicide among EMS providers has become recognized as the collateral damage suffered because of the cumulative stresses of PTSD, fatigue, and failure to seek help due to the stigma the industry often demonstrates towards addicts, system abusers and the mentally ill.

Yet- none of this happens in a vacuum. Somebody knows there is a problem, yet says nothing. What’s going on? Is “compassion fatigue” a real thing? Is this a kind of “bystander apathy” where diffusion of responsibility causes inaction? How do we fix it? Can we?
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

Clinical Course
Course Title: Little Acts of Mercy: Cardiac Arrest and Field Termination of Resuscitation Efforts
Course Presenter: Steven “Kelly” Grayson, NRP, CCEMT-P
Founder, MEDIC Training Solutions

Course Description: We’ve known for years now that, for uncomplicated medical cardiac arrest, there is little an Emergency Department can do that an ALS ambulance crew cannot, for both adults AND children. But, despite the evidence that in pre-hospital cardiac arrest the patient is usually either resuscitated on scene or not at all and that these interruptions in CPR to package and transport hinder resuscitation efforts, many EMS systems and individual EMS crews still routinely transport working cardiac arrests. Why? Join Kelly Grayson as he makes a case for “working ‘em where they lay,” and no matter the outcome, how to treat the family with professionalism and compassion every step of the way.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

 
Time: 3:00 p.m.

Administrative Course
Course Title: Jurassic EMS- a path to evolution, not extinction for long-term providers.
Course Presenter: Nancy Magee, NREMT
Consultant, Managing Partner, MEDIC Training Solutions

Course Description: Do the dinosaurs need to go? Or is EMS still too young to survive without the wisdom of these tribal elders?

Corporate America is desperately seeking to retain older employees because it recognizes the brain drain that can happen when experienced people leave faster than new ones can replace them. According to the Harvard Business Review ,70% of all organizational change efforts fail, and one reason for this is executives simply don’t get enough buy-in, from enough people, for their initiatives.

How can you take advantage of a dinosaur’s wisdom and experience and get him to “buy in” to the rapid changes in modern EMS practice? When you talk, what does he hear?

Many articles and seminars talk about ways to engage and recruit millennials. As smart and tech savvy as they are, they still need mentoring. We need to learn how to bridge that generation gap, by recognizing and respecting what long term providers have to offer, and creating a learning environment dedicated to the unique needs of older, and often skeptical, adults.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

Clinical Course
Course Title: Sepsis: Recognizing the Silent Killer
Course Presenter: Steven “Kelly” Grayson, NRP, CCEMT-P
Founder, MEDIC Training Solutions

Course Description:“Granny has a fever.” We’ve all run those calls, but are they as routine as we believe? In reality, sepsis is the #1 non-cardiac killer of ICU patients, with a mortality rate well over 50%. It is a clinical syndrome that affects over 750,000 Americans a year, and one that is undergoing increasing attention from pre-hospital providers. Early recognition and treatment is the key to survival. This presentation will examine the integral role of EMS in the management of sepsis, including Sepsis Alert Criteria and pre-hospital treatment guidelines.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

 


Day Two: Friday, October 12

Time: 10:45 a.m.

Administrative Course
Course Title: Emergency Site Coordination – Crisis Leadership
Course Presenter: Jeff Harvey, DEL, CEM

Course Description: When a school shooting or other crisis emergency event occurs, who is in charge when and when does that change of command shift? Initially, before 911 is called and until the 1st first responder arrives the highest ranking role is in charge (per NIMS). As soon as a responder arrives, that individual is in charge, and he/she can transfer command to someone higher ranking or more qualified. If necessary, law enforcement officers (LEOs) arrive on scene, neutralize the shooter, and secure the facility. Then the operation transitions to a mass casualty response, attending to the needs of the victims and the injured. EMS now has the primary operational responsibility. Yet LE still has investigative responsibilities going on while triage is underway. So, who’s in charge?

The reality is that regardless of who is the designated incident command, LEO leadership will be in charge of the LEO investigation and EMS leadership will be in charge of operational EMS. No one loses authority. For this session, this session will discuss what NIMS says about filling the role of incident commander as well as a transition to what NIMS calls “unified command” for these types of situations.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

Clinical Course
Course Title: After the Mayday: Dealing with the Injured Firefighter and Gear Removal.
Course Presenter: Robert M. Smith, B.S., M.S.

Course Description:This class will address how to properly manage the injured firefighter who has been exposed to a super-heated environment. So many courses deal with calling the mayday or how to self-rescue, this program prepares you to help the injured firefighter by quickly removing his or her turnout gear. Bring you EMS shears because attendees will practice cutting turnout gear away from an injured college.

This class is designed for both fire and EMS providers.
Credit Hours: 1.5 Hours

 

Disclaimer: Conference course are subject to change without notice. In the event a course is changed, the event organizers will make a reasonable attempt to secure suitable replacements of a similar subject matter.